Friday, July 8, 2011

New Specs Could Take The Guesswork Out Of Reading Emotions

http://www.vancouversun.com/health/specs+take+guesswork+reading+emotions/5066407/story.html

Sounds really interesting. I would love to see that work in real time.  It would be interesting for me to see what I am interpreting wrong, or just plain oblivious to.  Though, it wouldn't work on me, or probably most autistics.  My facial expressions are misinterpreted all the time by NTs.   So, such a device would say that I was mad or upset probably all the time, even when I am not even close. lol

3 comments:

  1. *nods thoughtfully* A few years back, my mother mentioned to me that she never knew what I was thinking or feeling. I was astounded, having never realized that what I *thought* I was communicating with facial expressions (a lot of which I had to learn; my default expression is fairly neutral, as I understand it, with the corners of my mouth turned down because that's the way they are), I actually wasn't. Yes, if I make a conscious effort I can look happy, and she can tell I'm happy if I'm laughing, and now knows if a hot-spot is hit because I flush and my lips quiver, but.... *shrugs helplessly*

    And while I can intellectually get the gist of what people's body language is saying if there's just one or two people around, if there's more, I can't process it. It's one of the reasons I get *really* uncomfortable around even small crowds; I don't know how anyone is going to react to anything, because I can't read them.

    ;) tagAught

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  2. Actually, just thought of something while responding to your post on loneliness, but thought it would fit better here.

    The local ASD friend I made commented to me once that he liked Japanese anime (cartoons) for one simple reason: all the expressions are generally exaggerated for effect, so it takes a *lot* less guesswork to understand the emotional states and cues that the characters are giving off. Apparently North American cartoons also do this to a somewhat lesser extent. It's part of what taught him at least a bit about body language, making the cognitive process of interpretation just a wee bit easier. Just a possible thought for parents....

    :) tagAught

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    Replies
    1. I have heard others say the same about anime. I've never liked it, but it's pretty popular with a lot of AS people.

      Delete

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